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American and European Art glass - Victorian and Art Nouveau to Contemporary


A Brief Overview


Orient & Flume Art Glass

About 1893, one characteristic home with a carriage house was built in the historic Oriental section of a small Northern California town. Located between Orient Street and Flume Street, this site was destined to play an important role in the story Orient & Flume.

In 1972, the house was purchased by Douglas and Carol Boyd, and with the help of partner David Hopper, the carriage house was transformed into an art glass studio. Carol Boyd realized the combination of street names expressed the feeling they wanted for their studio and the business name was originated. The word Orient means "pearl of great beauty, value, and luster." Flume is derived from the French word meaning "to flow."

Early efforts of these artists were directed toward recreating the silver-luster of iridescent glass of such turn-of-the-century studios as Tiffany, Steuben, and Loetz. They continually experimented with glass formulas, glass melting, and innovative decorating techniques. In time, this led to the creation of their intricate, three-dimensional designs encased in clear glass.

In 1973 they outgrew the carriage house and the business was moved to Park Avenue where today the beautiful retail outlet and the blow shop is a source of great pride to the company.

Their creations can be found in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum, the Smithsonian Museum, the Chicago Art Institute, the Chrysler Museum, the Corning Glass Museum and fine stores and galleries throughout the world. Today, tourists come from all over the world to visit the studio and watch the glass blowers at work.